Case scenario

Steve is a 69-year-old man with T2DM who was diagnosed two years ago by his GP. He is classified as obese with a body mass index of 31; he has a past history of cardiovascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, anxiety and a 40 pack/year smoking history which he quit after being diagnosed with T2DM.

His current medicines include: clopidogrel, atorvastatin, ramipril, duloxetine, metformin and insulin glargine 100 units/mL. He has no other comorbidities nor allergies. As his regular pharmacist, you know that Steve was reluctant to start on insulin glargine 100 units/mL 4 months ago even though his ‘sugars were a mess’; he has been having difficulty managing the dose to control his blood sugar levels. Since he commenced the insulin, you’ve noticed he’s become more anxious, often calling you – uncertain about his dose and what to do if he gives himself the wrong dose.

You know that Lantus Solostar will no longer be available from 1 July 2020 and Steve will need to transition to an alternative option. Whilst Steve has his other medicines dispensed as generics, you’re uncertain how he’ll react to a change in brand of his insulin glargine 100 units/mL. You’re concerned he’ll potentially be given the wrong information by someone else, risking harming the relationship you have with Steve as well as further compromising his diabetes control.

Learning objectives

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