Case scenario

Amara, 32, with newly diagnosed Crohn’s disease, presents a prescription for prednisolone and methotrexate (MTX); both are new medicines. The GP has handwritten ‘folate tablet weekly’ and ‘iron tablet daily’. Amara is aware of the need to have regular blood tests after commencing the MTX, but she isn’t aware of any iron deficiency. She is happy to start a daily iron tablet to prevent anaemia.

Learning objectives

After successful completion of this CPD activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Discuss induction therapy for Crohn’s disease
  • Discuss maintenance management of Crohn’s disease
  • Summarise the role of the pharmacist in managing a patient with Crohn’s disease.

Competency standards (2016) addressed: 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2

Already read the CPD in the journal? Scroll to the bottom to SUBMIT ANSWERS.

Introduction

Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are two of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Both diseases fall under the umbrella term of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and share similarities in clinical presentation, requiring specialist diagnosis and input. CD can affect the entirety of the GIT, whereas UC characteristically involves the rectum extending into the colon. Despite this, owing to their similarities, patients’ diagnoses can be reclassified during their management. Alternatively, if a clear distinction cannot be made, a patient’s diagnosis can be referred to as IBD unclassified (IBD-U).1,2

Currently, there is no known cure for CD.

THIS IS A CPD ARTICLE. YOU NEED TO BE A PSA MEMBER AND LOGGED IN TO READ MORE.