Case scenario

Jane is a 20-year-old female with generalised tonic-clonic seizures. She has been a regular patient at your pharmacy since her diagnosis of epilepsy when she was 10 years old. She has previously been on sodium valproate and levetiracetam but couldn’t tolerate their adverse effects. Her neurologist started her on lamotrigine and she has been seizure free for the last 4 years. Jane comes in with a new prescription from her GP for the oral contraceptive pill (OCP).

Learning objectives

After successful completion of this CPD activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Summarise the different types of seizures.
  • Identify the physical, psychological and social complications of epilepsy.
  • Describe first-line treatment options for different epilepsy syndromes.
  • Recognise the role of the pharmacist in the management of epilepsy

Competency standards addressed (2016): 1.1, 1.5, 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2

After additional reading and research from recommended sources, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Identify drug-drug interactions when treating people with epilepsy
  • Recognise drug-disease state interactions and the significance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug properties in people with epilepsy
  • Summarise the importance of pharmacokinetic bioequivalence in relation to pharmacotherapeutic options for epilepsy

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