Michael, 42, presents to the pharmacy, seeking treatment and advice on how to minimise a large scar resulting from a motorbike accident 8 weeks ago. At the time, the laceration was treated and closed with simple interrupted sutures. Michael has been using an onion extract gel twice daily to prevent scarring, however the scar has become quite raised. On examination, you identify that the laceration wound has healed, and there is now a large red and raised scar within the boundaries of the original injury.

Learning objectives

After reading this article, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Identify the different types of scars
  • Discuss management and treatment options for scars
  • Explain the role of the pharmacist.

Competency standards (2016) addressed: 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 3.1, 3.5

Already read the CPD in the journal? Scroll to the bottom to SUBMIT ANSWERS.

Introduction

When a deep wound, burn or sore heals, it often leaves a cutaneous scar. Superficial wounds (i.e. wounds that are confined to the stratum corneum and epidermis and do not reach the reticular dermis) generally do not cause scarring.1 While the global incidence is unknown, data shows that across developed countries, approximately 100 million people will acquire a scar in a calendar year.2 Scars can be the result of a range of cutaneous injuries, such as physical trauma, surgery, burns, vaccinations, cosmetic piercings, folliculitis,

THIS IS A CPD ARTICLE. YOU NEED TO BE A PSA MEMBER AND LOGGED IN TO READ MORE.